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  • Mon, May 08, 2017 2:23 PM | Tani Santos

    By: Scott Flaherty,The Am Law Daily

    Former Grant & Eisenhofer director and practice leader Adam Levitt is leaving to lead a newly formed plaintiffs firm, along with a pair of lawyers formerly of Cleveland's DiCello Law Firm.

    The new firm, DiCello Levitt & Casey, announced its launch Monday morning and will be helmed by founding partners Levitt, Mark DiCello and James Casey. The plaintiffs firm will start with 11 lawyers, a full support staff and offices in Chicago and Cleveland.

    Beyond the founders, the new firm will also count as partners John Tangren, formerly of Grant & Eisenhofer, Amy Keller, formerly of Wexler Wallace, and Robert DiCello, who comes from DiCello Law and is Mark DiCello's brother.

    Levitt, who left Grant & Eisenhofer's Chicago office after serving as head of the firm's consumer protection and product liability group, said in an interview that he felt the time was right to branch off.

    Full Article


  • Fri, May 05, 2017 4:23 PM | Tani Santos

    By: Olga Mack and Katia Bloom, Above the Law


    As long-term dwellers of Silicon Valley, we often-times feel like we are members of the disrupt generation. It’s hard to go grab coffee with a friend, or attend any type of event without the word “disrupt” making a solid appearance. This got us thinking: what do we think will disrupt the legal industry in the short term? Below are the four trends that we think are going to change the practice of law, and how we can all be ready for them.

    Full Article

  • Fri, May 05, 2017 10:28 AM | Tani Santos

    By Elizabeth Olson, New York Times

    Harvard Law School, expanding a pilot program for Harvard undergraduates, said Wednesday that it would allow juniors accepted from any college to defer admission as long as they finish college and spend at least two years working, studying or pursuing research or fellowships.

    The expanded program will be open to students applying starting this fall. The existing pilot program, for Harvard juniors, was started in 2014 to encourage students to gain work experience before entering law school and to encourage those studying science, technology, engineering or math to pursue the legal profession.

    Full Article

  • Tue, May 02, 2017 9:09 AM | Tani Santos


    LEAH THORNTON

    Recruiting, HR, PD Coordinator

    Allen & Overy


    How long have you been a member of WALRAA? What has been your favorite experience so far?
    3 years; my favorite experience has been the mentoring program.

    How did you first learn about and get started in Attorney Recruiting/Career Services?
    I was an intern for a law firm in undergrad and loved my time there; upon graduating, I decided to pursue it full time!

    What is the best professional advice you have received? 
    That everyone is my client and also my agent.

    What do you like to do for fun? 
    I love to read, and I mentor high school girls through an organisation at a local high school.
  • Thu, April 27, 2017 10:10 AM | Tani Santos

    By: Daniella Isaacson, Esq., Legal Intelligence

    At this rate, women equity partners will reach 30 percent—by 2081. Without extraordinary new efforts, parity remains a distant possibility[1]

    It is no secret that a lack of gender diversity is a long suffering issue for most industries, resulting in women facing greater risk of disenfranchisement by implicit bias within predominantly male organizations and in a lack of women in top leadership roles.

    Big Law, in particular, is at a crossroads when it comes to gender diversity. In fact, the number of female lawyers in the Am Law 200 has flat-lined for the past five years at slightly over 30% of the workforce.  There is no disputing that this is an embarrassing statistic.  As enforcers of equal opportunity, lawyers are at the forefront of the push for equality as a legal matter. At the same time, the law is consistently ranked as one of the worst industries for hiring and retaining a diverse workforce and has failed to improve the bottom line despite efforts to change.

    Full Article


  • Tue, April 25, 2017 4:26 PM | Tani Santos

    By: Elizabeth Olson, New York Times


    W. Neil Eggleston, a former White House counsel to President Barack Obama, is returning to the law firm Kirkland & Ellis as a partner in its government, regulatory and internal investigations practice in Washington.

    Mr. Eggleston, 63, was a partner at Kirkland, a 1,900-lawyer corporate law firm, in 2014 when Mr. Obama named him to the White House post. In that job, he advised the president on legal and constitutional issues involving foreign policy and domestic matters, including congressional investigations, the judicial selection and appointments process, government ethics and petitions for clemency.

    “I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to serve in the White House under President Obama, and am looking forward to returning to Kirkland & Ellis, private practice and teaching once again,” Mr. Eggleston said in a statement.

    Full Article


  • Wed, April 19, 2017 3:20 AM | Tani Santos

    By Kate Farrar:

    Attending conferences might be one of the best things you can do for your career. You’ll learn about industry trends, gain some new skills, and make all kinds of new connections . (And yes, there’s usually travel and free meals involved.)

    But all those speakers, sessions, contacts, and conversations can also be overwhelming. Besides bringing boatloads of business cards and collecting them from other people , what else should you be planning on when you have an event coming up? From prepping beforehand to having a great time while you’re there, here’s what you need to know to make the most of your next conference. 

    Full Article 

  • Mon, April 17, 2017 4:39 PM | Tani Santos


    KEVIN DONOVAN

    Senior Assistant Dean 

    Career Services

    University of Virginia School of Law


    How long have you been a member of WALRAA? What has been your favorite experience so far?
    1-2 years. It's hard to pick a favorite because all of the programming is good, but I really enjoy the holiday reception.

    How has WALRAA helped you in your field?

    WALRAA has been a great way to get to know the DC recruiters better and to develop a stronger knowledge of their firms. It has also provided more interaction with other Career Services professionals on the school side.

    How did you first learn about and get started in Attorney Recruiting/Career Services?

    I worked on recruiting throughout my 19 years in firm practice (serving on the Recruiting Committee for many of those years). When I decided I was interested in a new challenge, this was the only job for which I applied. (P.S. It has been a great choice.)

    How do you balance your career and personal life?

    You're supposed to do that? Just kidding. I try to stay committed to time with my family and one good hobby. I am one of those people who actually likes work, however. It took me a long time to admit that to myself. But that also allowed me to ease up on myself for spending more time working than is probably rational otherwise.

     What is the best professional advice you have received?

    You cannot litigate in fear. (And it carries over to other jobs.) Do the right things for the right reasons and don't be fearful about the consequences or the outcomes.

    Tell us something about yourself that most people don’t know.

    Most people don't know that I have an absolutely great list of the best movies ever filmed.




  • Thu, April 13, 2017 9:57 AM | Tani Santos

    By Julie Bagdikian, The Pollack PR Marketing Group

    Social media can be used to build a thought leadership platform, increase market share, improve business intelligence, network and attract new talents. There is no cookie-cutter recipe for success on social media though. It’s just like baking desserts; the ingredients must be carefully chosen and measured. If a single thing goes amiss, the whole dessert is ruined. The soufflé collapses. The meringue crumbles. But the good news is, the framework of a social media strategy is no different than a recipe

    Full Article.

  • Tue, April 11, 2017 9:43 AM | Tani Santos

    By Ellen Rosen, New York Times

    Like other Silicon Valley giants, Facebook has faced criticism over whether its work force and board are too white and too male. Last year, the social media behemoth started a new push on diversity in hiring and retention.

    Now, it is extending its efforts into another corner: the outside lawyers who represent the company in legal matters.Facebook is requiring that women and ethnic minorities account for at least 33 percent of law firm teams working on its matters.

    Numbers alone, however, are not enough, under a policy that went in effect on Saturday. Law firms must also show that they “actively identify and create clear and measurable leadership opportunities for women and minorities” when they represent the company in litigation and other legal matters.

    Full Article

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